Purpose of this blog

This blog will really be a true web log. I will post here about different wood-fired ovens as I find them.

If you know of any wood-fired ovens I should know about, you can send an e-mail to me. (If you build wood-fired ovens, I would like to hear from you too.)

There will lots of posts and lots of labels, since I plan to create one post for every appropriate web site that I find, and however many labels it takes to describe each one (usually at least the type of page and the location of the oven).

The accumulated information will still be found at the real Quest for Ovens web site links pages, but that is not updated as frequently as this blog will be.

If you are from outside the US and Canada, let me know what you find interesting about it. I see that I get visitors from India and Iran, and other faraway places. I'd like to know what draws you to this blog.

I received e-mail from the organizers of the BBC Two television show asking if the Saint Paul Bread Club could post a notice about their show Great British Bake-Off for amateur bakers. The information they gave me is now accessible through a link. (The organizers don't have a web page for the show itself yet.)

Please share this with any amateur bakers in Great Britain you may know, or post the link where they might see it.


Monday, February 14, 2011

Brick Oven The Bangor Rye Bread, Bangor, Maine

An on-line article for the Bangor Daily News covers the sale of a "city institution."

There seems to be some disagreement about the name for the business.

The article calls it "Brick Oven Bangor Rye Bakery."

LiveStrong.com calls it "Brick Rye Bread."

Hotfrog.com calls it "Brick Oven The Bangor Rye Bread."

Menuclub.com also calls it "Brick Oven The Bangor Rye Bread."

A site called YiPpIe! just calls it "Brick Oven."

All this is complicated by the fact that they don't seem to have a web site of their own.

The article says in part, "Bangor Rye is as famous for its challah, sub rolls, bulkees and hard rolls as it is for the family that owned and operated it for decades."

According to the article, the current owner hasn't had a vacation in 25 years and works six days a week.

It's a real bakery with real bakery work hours, "The bakery currently employs 14 people, running one shift. The Hustons come in around 8:30 p.m. to go through orders and begin making the dough needed, and the crew shows up at around 11 p.m. to start making the breads."

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